Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services

What is kinship care?

Kinship care is provided by a person who is a relative, considered to be family or a close friend, or is a member of the child or young person's community.

Kinship carers can assist children and young people to maintain connections with their family.

For Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children, a kinship carer may be another Indigenous person who is a member of their community, a compatible community or from the same language group.

Steps to becoming a kinship carer

Once you have made the decision that you are interested in being a kinship carer, there are a number of steps you go through to become an approved kinship carer.

The aim of this approval process is to make sure that you:

  • are a suitable person to be an approved kinship carer, and all members of your household are suitable persons to associate with children and young people on a daily basis
  • are able to meet the standards of care in the Statement of Standards outlined in the Child Protection Act 1999
  • are able to help work towards achieving goals for the safety, care and protection of children or young people.

For more information on the process of becoming a kinship carer, see Steps to becoming a carer, download the fact sheet Fact sheet 7: Foster and kinship care – Steps to becoming a kinship carer (PDF, 366 KB) Fact sheet 7: Foster and kinship care – Steps to becoming a kinship carer (RTF, 78 KB) or contact the department on 1800 811 810 or 3224 8045.

Kinship carer literature

For information about the key themes and messages from national and international research on kinship care, see the paper Kinship Care: A Literature Review (PDF, 217 KB) Kinship Care: A Literature Review (RTF, 207 KB) (Child Safety Services, 2011).

Kinship care program description

For information about the department’s kinship care program refer to the Kinship care program description (PDF, 466 KB) Kinship care program description (RTF, 572 KB). The program description has been informed by the literature review Kinship Care: A Literature Review (Department of Communities, 2011). The program description defines the kinship care program in Queensland and outlines the elements that ensure it is effective and responsive to children’s needs, with a primary focus on the aspects of identifying, assessing and supporting kinship carers.

Kinship care practice skills development workshop

The Kinship care practice skills development workshop materials are available for use by departmental staff and foster and kinship care service staff to promote and support quality practice with kinship carers.

The purpose of the Kinship care workshop is to develop the knowledge and skills of Child Safety officers and foster and kinship care service staff to enable them to:

  • articulate and understand the benefits of kinship care
  • articulate and understand the challenges for kinship carers
  • engage in a strength-based partnership with kinship carers whilst keeping the child in focus.

The workshop was developed in consultation with departmental staff, kinship carers, Foster Care Queensland, Queensland Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Child Protection Peak and foster and kinship care service staff. Workshop materials include Facilitator notes, PowerPoint presentation and Activity handouts.

Download the complete workshop: Kinship care (ZIP, 1.5 MB)