Profiles

Carolyn Mason

Courtesy: Partnering Works

1990

Carolyn Mason

Carolyn Mason has held a wide range of positions in Queensland and Commonwealth government departments in State Development, Health, Employment, and Training. In 1990, she became the first Women’s Advisor to the Premier (Wayne Goss) and thereafter, Director, Office of the Cabinet, Women’s Policy Unit. She served as CEO of the Queensland Residential Tenancies Authority and then established her company Partnering Works Pty Ltd in 2006. She is a Director of the Queensland Museum Board, the Board of Professional Engineers of Queensland and a non-for-profit organisation related to women’s services. She is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Management, a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors and, in 1988, she was awarded a National Fellowship of the Institute of Public Administration Australia.

Source: Partnering Works, 2008, About Carolyn Mason, viewed 3 December 2008, <http://www.partneringworks.com.au/01_cms/details.asp?ID=19>.

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Justice Margaret White

Reproduced with permission from the collection of the Supreme Court of Queensland Library

1990

Justice Margaret White (1943 - )

Margaret White grew up in South Australia. In 1967, Margaret became the first Women’s Royal Australian Naval Service (WRANS) Reserve Officer commissioned in the reconstituted Reserve since the Second World War. After completing her law degree at the University of Adelaide, she gained admittance to the Bar in 1978, while working at the University of Queensland School of Law. In 1990, after just seven years’ full-time practice, she became the first female Master of the Supreme Court of Queensland. In March 1992, she was appointed Justice of the Supreme Court where she is believed to have issued Australia’s first judgement concerning material published on the World Wide Web, in ordering the removal of unacceptable material from a website.

Source: Purdon, S & Rahemtula, A (eds) 2005, A woman's place: 100 years of Queensland women lawyers, Supreme Court of Queensland Library, Brisbane.

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Women inspectors in the Queensland Police

Police Service Administration Act 1990 (PDF 739 KB). Courtesy: Commonwealth Government Office of Legislative Drafting and Publishing, Attorney-General’s Department, Canberra

1990

Women inspectors in the Queensland Police

Investigating neglect and discrimination of women in a wider public forum, the Fitzgerald Inquiry (1987-89) recommended that standing female police quotas be abandoned in favour of recruitment and promotion by merit. The recommendations were reflected in the Police Service Administration Act, passed in 1990. Immediately, five policewomen received promotions to Inspector level and there was a rapid increase in the number of female recruits which trebled to over 30% of the academy’s intake.

Source: Prenzler, T and Wimshurst, K 1997, ‘Blue Tunics and Batons: women and politics in the Queensland Police, 1970-1987’, Journal of Australian Studies, Issue 52, pp. 88-101, viewed 3 December 2008, <http://www.api-network.com/main/pdf/scholars/jas52_prenzlerwimhurst.pdf (PDF 45 KB)>.

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Glenys Fisher

Courtesy: Queensland Department of Employment and Industrial Relations

1990

Glenys Fisher (1959 - )

Glenys Fisher completed her Bachelor of Arts at the University of Queensland before working her way through the ranks at the (then) State Department of Labour Relations. In 1981, she accepted a research officer position with a public sector union and, in a few short years, rose to Chief Industrial Officer. In 1990, she became the first woman appointed to the Queensland Industrial Relations Commission. In her new role, she undertook an inquiry into pay equity in 2000/1 resulting in recent changes to legislation based on her report, Worth Valuing. A second pay equity inquiry was launched in 2007 resulting in her report, Pay Equity: Time to Act.

Source: Fisher, G 2009, personal biography, 20 January.

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Sister Angela Mary Doyle AO

Sister Angela Mary Doyle. Courtesy: The Courier-Mail

1990

Sister Angela Mary Doyle AO (1926 - )

Sister Angela Mary Doyle and the Mater Hospital in Brisbane have been working together for over 50 years, bringing health care to Queenslanders in need. Sister Doyle is renowned for establishing support and care for people from all backgrounds. In recognition of her work, she has been awarded numerous accolades including Queenslander of the Year (1989), the Australian Achiever Award (1990), Officer of the Order of Australia (AO) for service in the community (1993), and the Premier’s Queensland Greats Award (2001).

Source: SS Asturias, 2008, Sr Angela Mary Doyle AO, viewed 10 December 2008, <http://www.ssasturias.net/srangelamary.shtml>.

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Eagle Farm Women’s Prison and Factory

Plan of Female Barracks, Eagle Farm. Courtesy: Queensland State Archives (Image 659611)

1990

Eagle Farm Women’s Prison and Factory

In 1990, the site of the Eagle Farm Women’s Prison and Factory was listed on the Queensland Heritage Register. Initial construction on the prison began within five years of the establishment of Brisbane Town, making it one of the earliest building sites in Queensland history. The prison was opened in 1829 in attempt to separate male and female prisoners and, by 1836, was home to 40 female convicts. Despite additional fortifications, rendezvous between prisioners still occurred and by July of 1839, the prison was closed. The Eagle Farm site is one of the last remaining sites from the Brisbane convict period.

Source: The State of Queensland (Environmental Protection Agency), 2009, viewed 3 February 2009, <http://www.epa.qld.gov.au/projects/heritage/index.cgi?place=600186&back=1>.

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Galila Abdel Salam

Courtesy: G Abdel Salam, Personal collection

1991

Galila Abdel Salam

Galila, her husband Emad and their only child left Egypt in 1983 to start a new life in Australia, living first in Sydney and moving to Brisbane in 1989.

Galila became associated with the Logan Neighbourhood Centre (now Multilink) and within a few years became its Vice-President. In 1991, she formed the Islamic Women’s Association of Queensland (IWAQ) with approximately 270 members within the first year.

In 1996, IWAQ received Federal Government funding to assist in the resettlement of Muslim families, coming from as far as Albania, Bosnia, war-torn Lebanon, the Horn of Africa and Afghanistan (countries where women were often uneducated and illiterate). In 1997, IWAQ received further funding to look after Muslim elderly living at home.

IWAQ has become a key referral agency for the Department of Immigration, Multicultural and Indigenous Affairs and is the largest employer of multicultural women in Queensland.

Galila has also worked with the Migrant Women’s Emergency Support Services, which helped her identify that many Muslim women were unaware of basic women’s health concerns relating to pap smears and mammograms, and that Australian law did not tolerate any form of domestic violence.

In 2001, Galila’s team was awarded the ‘Excellence in Care’ Team Award by Aged Care Queensland, and in 2007, was the winner of the Mission of Hope, Australian Community Organisation of the Year. In 2008, Galila was awarded the Mission of Hope, Australian Muslim Woman of the Year.

Source: A Multicultural History of Australia, 2009, viewed 3 February 2009, <http://www.multiculturalaustralia.edu.au/doc/mok_salam.pdf (PDF 1.57 MB)>.

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Professor Julie Hazel Campbell BSc (Hons), PhD, AO, FAA

Courtesy: J Campbell, Private collection

1991

Professor Julie Hazel Campbell BSc (Hons), PhD, AO, FAA (1946 - )

Julie Campbell studied cell biology in Melbourne, London and the USA before moving to Brisbane in 1991 and establishing the Centre for Research in Vascular Biology at the University of Queensland. As Director of the Centre, Julie has achieved international recognition for her landmark discoveries in smooth muscle cell biology and also for developing a new tissue engineering technique to grow blood vessels within a patient’s body from cells derived from his/her own bone marrow. Julie has published over 220 papers in international scientific journals and has written two books, while raising three children and caring for a host of companion and farm animals. In 1995, she received the Wellcome Australia Medal for her contributions to medical and scientific research, in 2000 she was elected a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science (the second Queensland woman since 1954), and in 2003 she received a Centenary Medal. In 2006 Julie was made an Officer of the Order of Australia (AO), and in 2007 won the Queensland Business Woman of the Year Award (Public and Not-for Profit). Julie is also the inaugural Director of the Wesley Research Institute at the Wesley Hospital and a Senior Principal Research Fellow of the National Health and Medical Research Council.

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Elizabeth Nosworthy

Copyright: Newspix / Patrick Hamilton

1991

Elizabeth Nosworthy (1946 - )

Born in Brisbane and educated at Brisbane Girls Grammar School, Elizabeth Nosworthy began her distinguished career as an associate to a Supreme Court Justice. Thereafter, she became partner of a national law firm and gained more than twenty years’ experience as a commercial lawyer. Elizabeth went on to hold a range of directorships in both private and public sectors. In 1991, she was appointed Chancellor of Bond University on the Gold Coast, becoming the first woman to achieve such a high office at a Queensland university. Elizabeth was a member of the National Competition Council for five years. She is a fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors and was the first female president of the Queensland Law Society.

Sources:

  • Brasch, N (ed.) 1996, Contemporary Australian Women 1996/97, Reed Reference Australia, Australia.
  • Queensland Water Commission, 2006, Elizabeth Nosworthy AO, viewed 15 January 2009, <http://www.qwc.qld.gov.au/Elizabeth+Nosworthy>.

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Joan Mary Sheldon AM

Courtesy: J Sheldon, Personal collection

1991

Joan Mary Sheldon AM (1943 - )

Born in Bundaberg, Joan Sheldon’s distinguished political career began in 1972 when she joined the Liberal Party. In 1990, she won the seat of Landsborough (soon re-named Caloundra). In November 1991, Joan was elected Leader of the Parliamentary Liberal Party, becoming the first woman to lead a political party in Queensland and the first to lead a Liberal Party in Australia. From 1996 to 1998, Joan was Queensland's first female Deputy Premier and Treasurer, and the first female Treasurer in any state or federally in Australia. She was also the first woman to lead the State as acting Premier. In addition, she has also held the portfolios of Minister for the Arts and the Status of Women. Joan retired from politics in 2004. Throughout her parliamentary career, Joan became widely known for her unique debating style and her fight against the denigration of women. In 2005, she was appointed as a Member of the Order of Australia (AM) for her services to Queensland, women and the arts. Today, Joan is a Non Executive Director, Chair of the Queensland Ballet, and also Executive in Residence at the Australian Institute of Management (Queensland and Northern Territory).

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Anti-Discrimination Act

Anti-Discrimination Act (PDF 814 KB). Courtesy, Commonwealth Government Office of Legislative Drafting and Publishing, Attorney-General’s Department, Canberra

1991

Anti-Discrimination Act

In 1991, the Anti-Discrimination Act was passed, which promotes equal opportunity for everyone by protecting them from unfair discrimination, and from sexual harassment and associated objectionable conduct.

Source: The State of Queensland (Office of the Queensland Parliamentary Counsel), 2007, Anti-Discrimination Act 1991, viewed 10 December 2008, <http://www.legislation.qld.gov.au/LEGISLTN/CURRENT/A/AntiDiscrimA91.pdf (PDF 814 KB)>.

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Judith Arundell Wright McKinney

Courtesy: National Library of Australia (nla.pic-an29529596)

1991

Judith Arundell Wright McKinney (1915 - 2000)

Judith Wright was a prolific Queensland poet, conservationist, and campaigner for Aboriginal rights. Though best remembered for her passionate poetry, she also wrote children’s stories, books of criticism, and a novel called Generations of Men (1955) about her grandparents who were early Queensland settlers. She was the first woman appointed to the Council of the Australian National University, and was founder of the Wildlife Preservation Society of Queensland. In 1991, she became the first Australian woman to receive the Queen's gold medal for poetry. She is commemorated by the Judith Wright Centre of Contemporary Arts in Fortitude Valley- Brisbane’s most innovative creative-arts theatre. Judith fought for the environment and Aboriginal reconciliation right up until her death in June 2000.

Source: McKinney, M (2001), The State of Queensland (The Judith Wright Centre of Contemporary Arts), 2007, Who was Judith Wright?, viewed 19 January, <http://www.judithwrightcentre.com/01_cms/details.asp?ID=50>.

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Justice Margaret McMurdo

Reproduced with permission from the collection of the Supreme Court of Queensland Library

1991

Justice Margaret McMurdo (1954 - )

After working at a solicitor’s office during the Christmas break of 1971, Margaret McMurdo decided to undertake a career in law. She completed her degree at the University of Queensland in 1975 and started practising as a barrister in 1976. Following several years’ employment as an Assistant Public Defender, Margaret began private practise in 1989 and, just two years later in 1991, was appointed as Judge of the District Court of Queensland, becoming the first woman to attain this position. She also became the first woman in Australia to have a baby during her term as a judge, the first female president of an Australian Court of Appeal, and (with Justice Philip McMurdo) became part of the first husband-and-wife team to sit concurrently on the Supreme Court bench.

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Terri Irwin AO

Courtesy: Australia Zoo

1992

Terri Irwin AO

She jumps on crocs, wrangles venomous snakes, runs a zoo, shoots documentaries in some of the wildest places on Earth, educates people around the world and still makes time to raise a pair of gorgeous children. Who is this superwoman?

Terri Irwin was born and raised in Eugene, Oregon in the United States of America and was introduced to the world of wildlife conservation as a small child. At the age of 22, Terri established a wildlife rehabilitation facility called ‘Cougar Country’ to re-educate, rehabilitate and release predatory mammals such as cougars, bears and bobcats, and it was not long before she was caring for more than 300 animals a year.

In 1991 during a holiday to Australia, Terri visited a small roadside zoo in Beerwah where she met and fell in love with Steve Irwin. A whirlwind four-month courtship was followed by an engagement, and after their wedding in 1992, Steve and Terri spent their honeymoon on location in the Australian outback shooting their very first wildlife documentary.

In 1992, Steve’s parents, Bob and Lyn Irwin, retired and left the park to Steve and Terri to run. Terri has since been the driving force behind Australia Zoo’s continued success, transforming the four acre ‘Beerwah Reptile Park’ with a simple menagerie, to the impressive seventy acre world-class, award winning facility which is now home to over 1000 animals.

In 2006, Terri was awarded an Honorary Member in the General Division of the Order of Australia for her outstanding dedication to wildlife conservation and the tourism industry, particularly through Australia Zoo. Under Terri’s leadership, Australia Zoo has been recognised and honoured with many prestigious accolades including winning most recently the 2008/2009 Australian Tourism Awards – Major Tourist Attraction.

Source: Australia Zoo.

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Dr Carden Wallace

Courtesy: Dr Carden Wallace, Personal collection

1992

Dr Carden Wallace

Dr Carden Wallace began her career in science in 1970 with an Honours Degree at the University of Queensland, followed by an appointment as Curator of Lower Invertebrates at the Queensland Museum. In 1987, she became the first Director of the Museum of Tropical Queensland and remained in that position until 2003 when she was appointed Principal Researcher of the Queensland Museum. In 1992, Carden (along with four other James Cook University scientists), received the Eureka POL Prize for Environmental Research for the discovery of the mass annual spawning of over 100 species of coral on the Great Barrier Reef. Throughout her career, Carden has contributed to an extensive list of marine science research papers, reports, and publications. Like fellow marine scientist, Dr Patricia Mather, Carden successfully combined a career in a male-dominated industry with her commitment to raising a family.

Source: Bowen, M 1994, ‘Women of Distinction in Marine Science – Carden Wallace’, WISENET Journal, vol. 34, March 1994, pp. 10-12, viewed 18 December 2008, <http://www.wisenet-australia.org/profiles/qldmus.htm#wallace>.

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1992

Equal Opportunity in Public Employment Act

The Equal Opportunity in Public Employment Act was passed in 1992, and updated in 2008, providing for equal employment opportunities in the public sector. Target groups defined by the Act include women, persons with disabilities, immigrants whose first language is not English, and Indigenous Australians. The Act requires an agency to take steps to develop an Equal Employment Opportunity Management Plan for members of those target groups and to eliminate unlawful discrimination against them. It also requires the agency to implement that plan and establish procedures to monitor compliance.

Source: The State of Queensland (Office of the Queensland Parliamentary Counsel), 2007, Equal Opportunity in Public Employment Act 1992, Act No. 10 of 1992, viewed 25 November 2008, <http://www.legislation.qld.gov.au/LEGISLTN/ACTS/1992/92AC010.pdf (PDF 38 KB)>.

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Dr Patricia Mather AO

Courtesy: Dr Patricia Mather

1992

Dr Patricia Mather AO (1925 - )

With a career spanning almost 60 years, Dr Patricia Mather (nee Kott) has played a significant role in Queensland’s reef research and conservation. Graduating from the University of Western Australia with first class honours in 1948, Patricia’s career began as a Research Officer in CSIRO, and included 12 years as a Research Fellow at the University of Queensland. She joined the Queensland Museum in 1973 where she served as Senior Curator until her retirement in 1990. Patricia holds the following degrees: PhD (Qld, 1962), DSc (WA, 1970), DSc (hon.caus. Qld, 1990). As Secretary of the Great Barrier Reef Committee, Patricia played a leading role towards establishing the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority in 1975. In 1991 she was awarded a Queensland Museum Medal and in 1992 she was made an Officer in the Order of Australia (AO) and received the Jubilee Prize for Marine Science from the Australian Marine Sciences Association. Today, Patricia is an Honorary Associate at the Queensland Museum, where she continues her internationally recognised research.

Source: Bowen, M 1994, ‘Women of Distinction in Marine Science – Patricia Mather’, WISENET Journal, vol. 34, March 1994, pp. 10-12, viewed 18 December 2008, <http://www.wisenet-australia.org/profiles/qldmus.htm#mather>.

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Leneen Forde AC

Courtesy: L Forde, Personal collection

1992

Leneen Forde AC (1935 – )

Ottawa born Leneen Kavanagh moved to Brisbane in 1954 and married Gerry Forde. Widowed in 1966 with five young children she studied law and built a successful legal career. As the first president of the Women’s Lawyers Association she involved herself in many women’s issues before becoming the first woman to be appointed Governor of Queensland in 1992. In 1998, she oversaw the Forde Commission of Inquiry into abuse of children in Queensland institutions. Since 2000, she has served as Chancellor of Griffith University.

Source: Purdon, S & Rahemtula, A (eds) 2005, A woman's place: 100 years of Queensland women lawyers, Supreme Court of Queensland Library, Brisbane.

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Cheryl Kernot

Copyright: Newspix / News Ltd

1993

Cheryl Kernot (1948 - )

Cheryl Kernot’s distinguished political career began in 1979. She was first elected as a Senator for Queensland in 1990, becoming the first Queensland woman to represent the Australian Democrats in Parliament. In 1993, she became leader of the Australian Democrats and held this position until 1997, when she resigned from the Senate to stand for the House of Representatives in the Division of Dickson as a member of the Australian Labor Party. Cheryl was elected the Member for Dickson in 1998 and served one term. In 2008, after working at the Skoll Centre for Social Entrepreneurship at Oxford University, Cheryl joined the University of New South Wales’ Centre for Social Impact as its first Director of Teaching and Learning.

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Professor Marcia Langton AM

Copyright: Newspix / David Geraghty

1993

Professor Marcia Langton AM (1951 - )

Marcia Langton was born in Brisbane and educated at several state primary schools at Stanthorpe, Dirranbandi, Bollon and Brisbane, followed by Aspley State High School. Today Marcia is one of Australia’s foremost writers, anthropologists and advocates for Aboriginal rights. She has worked extensively with the Queensland Government, various universities and Indigenous groups, and has released a multitude of publications on Aboriginal affairs, artistic expression, and conservation. In recognition of her outstanding work, Marcia was made a Member of the Order of Australia (AM) in 1993. She spent several years teaching at Charles Darwin University until 2000 when she was appointed foundation Professor of Australian Indigenous Studies at the University of Melbourne.

The University of Melbourne, 2008, Centre for Health and Society – Marcia Langton, viewed 20 January 2009, <http://www.chs.unimelb.edu.au/about/staff_old/professor_marcia_langton>.

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Karrie Anne Webb

Copyright: Newspix / Geoff McLachlan

1996

Karrie Anne Webb (1974 - )

Born and educated in Ayr, Central Queensland, Karrie Webb’s interest in professional golf was encouraged by seeing Greg Norman play on her twelfth birthday. She left Australia in 1994 to seek success overseas and, after numerous victories (particularly the prestigious British Open in 1995), she was soon ranked in the world’s top ten. Karrie’s winning streak continued throughout 1996, as she triumphed at several major tournaments including the US LPGA Tour Championship. The prize money Karrie accumulated from these wins made her the first Australian sportswoman to win more than US$1 million in a year in sport. At the same time, she became the first female golfer to win more than US$1 million in a year on the US tour. Karrie continues to dominate women’s golf, recently winning the Women’s Australian Open in 2007 and 2008.

Source: Brasch, N 1997, Great Australian women in sport, Heinemann Library, Port Melbourne.

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Susie O’Neill

Copyright: Newspix / Steve Grove

1996

Susie O’Neill (1973 - )

One of Australia’s most successful swimmers ever, Susie O’Neill holds a record 35 Australian titles, eight Olympic medals and a string of victories at the international level. At the 1991 Pan Pacific Games, Susie became the first Australian female swimmer to break the one-minute mark for the 100 metre butterfly. At the 1994 Commonwealth Games in Canada, Susie won gold medals in both the 200 metre butterfly and the 200 metre freestyle events. In 1996, she went on to achieve her first gold medal at an Olympic Games in Atlanta in the 200 metre butterfly, becoming the first Queensland woman to win an individual Olympic gold medal. Her achievements in the pool, and particularly her trademark butterfly stroke, have led her to becoming more affectionately known as ‘Madame Butterfly’. Today, Susie juggles her role as a full-time mum with sponsor, charity and media commitments.

Source: Brasch, N 1997, Great Australian women in sport, Heinemann Library, Port Melbourne.

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Christine Anu

Copyright: Stylin Up Entertainment / Karen Watson Photography 2008

1996

Christine Anu (1970 - )

Born in Cairns, Christine Anu studied at the National Aboriginal and Islander Skills Development Association where she graduated with an Associate Diploma of Dance in 1992. Christine won her first ARIA award in 1996 for Best Female Artist. She is now backed by an award-winning repertoire spanning across music, theatre, dance, film, television and children’s entertainment. Today, Christine is arguably Australia’s most successful Indigenous performer and one of Australia’s most popular recording artists. Her illustrious career over two decades also boasts of platinum albums, sell-out musicals, Hollywood blockbusters, and high-profiled collaborations with showbiz and musical luminaries such as Baz Luhrmann (Moulin Rouge), Paul Kelly and David Atkins. Four solo albums later, Christine established Stylin Up Entertainment - a collective focused on developing and producing new media brands that are proudly Australian.

Sources:

  • Brasch, N 1997, Great Australian women in music, Heinemann Library, Port Melbourne.
  • Williamson Management n.d., Christine Anu, Williamson Management, Australia.

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Anne Geddes

Courtesy: K Geddes, Personal collection

1996

Anne Geddes

Born and raised in Queensland, Anne Geddes first professionally picked up a family camera in her mid-twenties, and self-taught, became one of the world's most respected photographers and a multiple New York Times and internationally bestselling author.

Capturing the beauty, purity, vulnerability, and preciousness of children, her imagery embodies her deeply held belief that every child must be protected, nurtured, and loved. Reflecting this belief, Anne Geddes and her husband, Kel, created the non-profit Geddes Philanthropic Trust, and through it, have donated more than US $4.5 million to help prevent child abuse in Australia, New Zealand, France, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Anne and Kel have established a Geddes Fellowship at the Children's Hospital at Westmead in Sydney, at the Starship Children's Hospital in Auckland New Zealand and the Children's Hospital of Orange County, Los Angeles, America.

Anne Geddes' iconic, award-winning, and beloved images published in 83 countries, have been featured in her books that have sold more than 18 million copies worldwide and been translated into 24 languages. Her internationally popular books include Down in the Garden (her 1st New York Times Best Seller 1996), Until Now, Pure, Miracle (with Celine Dion), and her autobiography, A Labor of Love.

Source: K Geddes, 2009, personal biography, 20 March.

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Maureen Watson

Courtesy: Photographer, Penny Tweedie

1997

Maureen Watson

An active leader and respected elder in Brisbane, ‘Auntie’ Maureen Watson was a storyteller, poet, singer, actor, and political activist. Born in Rockhampton, she was the daughter of a Birri Gubba man and Kungalu woman, leaving school at 13 and marrying at 21. In 1970, as mother to five children, Maureen moved to Brisbane to begin an arts course at The University of Queensland. She soon found herself at the forefront of the racial struggle and was arrested several times while participating in demonstrations. Highly regarded for her stories of Aboriginal culture and experiences in urban Australia, Maureen’s first collection of poetry, Black Reflections, was published in 1982. She then went on to produce another six anthologies, a children’s book, and a picture book. In 1996, Maureen was awarded the Australia Council Red Ochre award which pays tribute to an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artist who has made an outstanding lifetime contribution to Indigenous art.

Source: Australian Council for the Arts, 2007-2009, Maureen Watson, viewed 15 January 2009, <http://www.australiacouncil.gov.au/the_arts/artists_and_orgs/artists/maureen_watson>

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Jeannie Mok

Courtesy: J Mok, Personal collection

1997

Jeannie Mok

Raised in Malaysia, Jeannie, a university lecturer, migrated to Brisbane in 1981. During the controversy of the Blainey Debate on immigration in 1984, with the denigration of Asian migration, Jeannie wrote articles in the 'Courier Mail', championing the valuable contributions of Asian migrants to the nation. In 1997 she went on to chair the Alliance-Communities Against Racism and Discrimination to advocate the ideals of egalitarianism, multiculturalism, human rights, and social justice.

Jeannie is the Founding Principal of the Asian Pacific Institute and the Managing Director (volunteer) of the Multicultural Community Centre. She serves on the Multicultural Ministerial Advisory Committee, the Queensland China Council, Women's and Newborn Services Birthing Services Consumer Forum, the Queensland Cancer Screening Reference Group, Queensland State Library Multicultural Advisory Committee, Queensland Chinese Museum Committee and the Queensland Chinese Forum, and has served on the Refugee Resettlement Advisory Council to the Federal Government.

In 1997, Jeannie received the Premier's Multicultural Service Award and in 2003, the Centenary Medal, and in 2006, the Mayor's Cultural Award. She has written 6 books, 5 of which were funded by the Queensland Government. She is also a cross-cultural trainer and free-lance journalist.

Source: Mok J, 2009, personal biography, 22 May.

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Julie Boyd

Courtesy: J Boyd, Personal collection

1997

Julie Boyd

Having completed her studies in Brisbane in 1975 at the Mater Hospital, Julie Boyd originally trained as a Registered Nurse. She later studied Politics, South-East Asian Religions and History at the University of Queensland from 1976 to 1978, prior to travelling overseas to undertake Midwifery studies in Scotland in 1979.

After living in the United Kingdom for four years, and Adelaide for two years, in 1986 she moved to Mackay with her husband and three children.

Julie was first elected to Mackay City Council in 1988 (prior to the amalgamation of Mackay City Council and Pioneer Shire Council). She spent two years on this Council and in 1994 was elected as a Divisional Councillor to the newly amalgamated Mackay City Council.

In 1997 Julie was elected as the first female Mayor of Mackay. Julie was re-elected as Mayor again in 2000 and 2004, the first person in Mackay to be re-elected for a second and third term in over 15 years.

Julie now works as a Special Representative for Trade for Japan, Republic of Korea and the Philippines. She sits on the board of the Urban Land Development Authority and the Queensland Arts Council and recently taken over as President. She chairs the Mackay Whitsunday Regional Economic Development Board and the Australian Institute of Management Mackay committee, She is a Fellow of Australian Institute of Management (FAIM) and is a graduate of the Australian Institute of Company Directors (GAICD).

Source: Boyd J, 2009, personal biography, 28 May.

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Yvonne Zardani OAM

Copyright: Newspix / Patrick Hamilton

1998

Yvonne Zardani OAM

Yvonne Zardani was the Queensland State Secretary of the Australian Pensioners’ and Superannuants' League from 1991 to 2007. The aim of the League, run mainly by volunteers, is to provide a voice for people living on various types of pensions and superannuation funds. In 1998, Yvonne was awarded an Order of Australia Medal (OAM) for her dedicated community work, focusing primarily on women and the aged.

Source: Australian Pensioners’ and Superannuants' League, 2008, About Us, viewed 30 January 2009, <http://apsl.com.au/?page_id=2>.

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Vicki Wilson OAM

Copyright: Newspix / Brett Faulkner

1998

Vicki Wilson OAM (1965 - )

Vicki Wilson grew up in the Brisbane suburb of Murarrie, playing netball with the Cannon Hill Stars. After being noticed at the Under-19 Championships, Vicki declined an offer to join the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) in favour of completing her Physical Education degree at the Queensland University of Technology. A year later, she joined the AIS and, by 1985, was captain of the Queensland Firebirds and was representing Australia in international contests. She was awarded the Medal of the Order of Australia (OAM) in 1992 and was named Queensland Sportswoman of the year in 1993. At the 1998 Commonwealth Games in Malaysia, Vicki led the Australian netball team to its inaugural gold medal victory before retiring from representative sport. At the time of her retirement in 1999, she was the world’s number one netball goal shooter and the only Australian player to have played in four World Championships. Today, Vicki plays an active role in the future development of netball and currently sits on the board of Queensland Academy of Sport.

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Ruth Hegarty

Copyright: R Hegarty, Personal collection

1998

Ruth Hegarty (1929 - )

Thought to be the first Aboriginal baby born at Mitchell Hospital in southwest Queensland, Ruth Hegarty and her mother Ruby were soon moved to the Cherbourg settlement. When Ruby was sent away to work, four year-old Ruth was moved into a girls’ dormitory where she received only minimal education and infrequent contact with her mother. At 14, scared and alone, Ruth was sent to a station homestead to perform domestic work until she married childhood friend, Joe, and moved to Brisbane. Ruth reared eight children while volunteering with various programs for the elderly and youth, and helping to establish the Koobara Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Family Resource Centre. In 1998, ‘Auntie Ruth’ won the David Unaipon Award for her story Is That You, Ruthie, recounting her life in the Cherbourg dormitory. Also in 1998, she received the Premier’s Award for Queensland Seniors for her outstanding service to the community. She released a sequel to Ruthie in 2003, Bittersweet Journey, which describes her battle to improve the quality of life for her family and community.

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Sarah-Jane Clarke and Heidi Middleton (sass & bide)

Copyright: Deborah Pauwwe

1999

Sarah-Jane Clarke and Heidi Middleton (sass & bide)

Sarah-Jane Clarke and Heidi Middleton, originally hailing from Brisbane, crossed paths 15 years ago and instantly knew that their friendship was nothing short of extraordinary. In 1999, they travelled to London and hit the stalls of the Portobello Road markets selling one-off customised jeans. With the success of their London market, sass and bide (their respective nicknames) followed their hearts and moved back to Australia with a strong vision to grow the sass & bide brand into seasonal ready-to wear collections. Nearly a decade on, the label has shown at New York, London and Australian fashion weeks, earning international acclaim as well as top media and celebrity support from the likes of Kate Moss, Helena Christensen and Kate Bosworth. Sarah-Jane and Heidi are also actively involved in the ‘Fashion Targets Breast Cancer’ program; the fashion industry’s international campaign to raise awareness for the cause.

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Kerrie Tim

Courtesy: K Tim, Private collection

1999

Kerrie Tim

A graduate of the University of Queensland, in 1999 Kerrie Tim became the first Indigenous woman to be appointed as Executive Director of the Queensland Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Policy (DATSIP). Following her role in DATSIP, Kerrie continued to build extensive experience in public administration and served as the Executive Director of the Queensland Department of the Premier and Cabinet, and as Acting Executive Director of the Office for Women. Kerrie has represented governments, including Queensland, internationally in forums in the Philippines, United States and Canada and has led peer counselling workshops on ending racism in South Africa, Israel, and New Zealand. A former Director of the Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre and the National Alternative Dispute Resolution Advisory Committee, Kerrie has extensive experience teaching and leading on ending racism and leadership development. Kerrie is currently a Senior Executive in the Australian Government Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs. Raised Kalkadoon on the land of the Mitakoodi, Kerrie’s culture is the foundation of her success.

Source: Queensland Government, Ideas Festival, 2008, Ideas Program 2001 - speakers 8: Kerrie Tim, viewed 4 December 2008, <http://www.ideasfestival.com.au/2001/2_program/speakers_bios_h.htm#tim>.

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Justice Jacqueline Payne

Courtesy: J Payne, Personal collection

1999

Justice Jacqueline Payne (1961 - )

Jacqueline Payne was born in Atherton, North Queensland, and grew up in Gladstone. She commenced her law degree at the (then) Queensland Institute of Technology in 1979 and was admitted as a solicitor in 1986. After spending 14 years in criminal defence, in 1999, Jacqueline became the first Indigenous woman appointed Stipendiary Magistrate and the first Indigenous Australian appointed to a judicial position in Queensland.

Source: Purdon, S & Rahemtula, A (eds) 2005, A woman's place: 100 years of Queensland women lawyers, Supreme Court of Queensland Library, Brisbane.

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Air Vice-Marshal Julie Hammer AM, CSC

Copyright: Newspix / Michael Jones

1999

Air Vice-Marshal Julie Hammer AM, CSC (1955 - )

Electronics engineer, Julie Hammer served in the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) for over 28 years. In 1992, she became the first woman to command an operational unit in the RAAF in the Electronic Warfare Squadron. She was the first serving woman in the history of the Australian Defence Force to achieve One Star rank in 1999 and Two Star rank in 2003. She was awarded a Conspicuous Service Cross (CSC) in 1996 and was made a Member of the Order of Australia (AM) in 2004. In 2008, she became the National President of Engineers Australia and the first woman ever to hold that position.

Sources:

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Jan Power

Copyright: Newspix, News Ltd

1999

Jan Power

Jan Power is the original owner and operator of the Jan Power's Farmers Markets.

Born on a sheep farm in Stanthorpe, Jan left at the age of four to board at Brisbane's Stuartholme School, which her late grandfather TC Beirne had co-founded. She finished school and trained as a nurse at St Vincent's hospital in Sydney and specialised as an emergency theatre sister.

After marrying, a stint in London (where she trained as a Cordon Bleu cook) and two children, Power returned to Brisbane and started her catering company 'The Loaves and Fishes'. She also opened a cafe in Her Majesty's Theatre.

Jan partnered with Alison Alexander to begin the Brisbane Farmers Markets in 1999. Initially, these markets had no women independently managing stalls, now ten years later women make up at least half the stallholders.

Jan has been a regular food expert in various media including television, newspapers and magazines, and has been heard on ABC radio for over 15 years. She is a consultant to the food industry on products, presentation and marketing, is a sought after speaker on the national circuit, chairs the crime sections at writers festivals and works with the Brisbane Festival. Jan contributed 7 years to the Queensland Performing Arts Trust, becoming the first woman chairperson from 1997 to 1998.

Power J, 2009, personal biography, 8 April.

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Did you know?

  • 1990 - The total population of females in Queensland was 1,460,692 (with a ratio of 100.5 males to 100 females)
  • 1991 - There were 178,733 females in Queensland who were aged 65 and over, about 12.1% of all Queensland females
  • 1992 - The average age of women in Queensland was 35.0 years
  • 1993 - There were 46,778 births in Queensland (with a ratio of 15.0 births to 1000 residents)
  • 1994 - The life expectancy of females in Queensland was 80.8 years
  • 1996 - Women comprised of 43.4% of the state workforce
  • 1997 - There were 20,868 marriages (with a ratio of 6.1 marriages to 1000 residents) and 11,744 divorces (with a ratio of 3.5 divorces to 1000 residents) in Queensland.

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Last updated 21 September 2009