Investing in families and children

The Queensland Government is investing $425 million over the five years from 2014–15 to 2018–19 to implement the reforms to the child protection and family support system, and better support the state's most vulnerable families and children.

Investments in 2016–17

In 2016-17, the government will continue to invest in initiatives and services to support Queensland families earlier and reduce the over-representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in care.

Further details are outlined in the media statement, Vital funds delivered to keep children, women safe, boost jobs.

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Investments in 2015–16

In 2015-16, an investment of almost $55 million will include:

  • $9.3 million to continue and expand Family and Child Connect services across the state.

    This includes new funding of $4.5 million for six new Family and Child Connect services in Brisbane, Mackay, Mount Isa–Gulf, Cairns and surrounds, Cape York and Torres Strait. These services assess the needs of families who are struggling to cope and connect them directly to the support services they need. By 2016, Queensland will have 19 Family and Child Connect services, with funding of $39.78 million over three years, which is estimated to help 35,000 families.

  • $24.2 million to continue and expand intensive family support and domestic and family violence services, targeting vulnerable families with multiple and complex needs

    This includes new funds of $3.8 million for new intensive family support services in Brisbane, Mackay, Mount Isa–Gulf, Cairns and surrounds, Cape York and Torres Strait. These services will help develop parenting skills, establish household routines and manage children's behaviour. They will also offer practical help with household budgeting, transport to appointments (e.g. with health professionals), and securing and maintaining stable housing.

  • $2.4 million to support the expansion and integration of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander family support services and child protection services, and $1.5 million for support services for families in regional and remote communities

    Government and non-government organisations are partnering to develop and implement strategies and service models that will improve Indigenous families’ access to culturally appropriate programs and services, at the right time, to help reduce the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and families in the child protection system.
  • $3.3 million to continue delivering the statewide network of Next Step After Care Services

    These targeted, post-care support services help young people aged 15–21 years during the crucial transition from out-of-home care to independence.

  • $400,000 to assist community sector partners to design a consistent therapeutic framework for residential care

    A new trauma-informed therapeutic framework will improve outcomes for children and young people in residential care and independent living facilities, by better supporting them to recover from trauma they may have experienced.

  • $595,000 to design and implement comprehensive health assessments for all children and young people entering statutory care.

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Investments in 2014–15

In 2014-15, an investment of almost $25 million will include:

  • $2.9 million to establish community-based services known as Family and Child Connect in seven locations across Queensland

    These services will improve assessment of needs and give families more direct access to the range of services.
  • $6.5 million to expand secondary family support services targeting vulnerable families with multiple and complex needs

    These intensive family support services and domestic and family violence services will help develop parenting skills, establish household routines and manage children's behaviour. They will also offer practical help with household budgeting, transport to appointments (e.g. with health professionals), and securing and maintaining stable housing.
  • $3 million to develop and implement a child protection practice framework to better support families to care for their children at home

    The new framework will better equip frontline child protection workers with the contemporary training and tools to support families earlier to care safely for their children, and avoid out-of-home care.

  • $2.5 million to improve support for young people transitioning from out-of-home care to independence

    For the first time, targeted post-care support will continue for young people up to the age of 21 in the crucial transition to independence.

  • $1.5 million to reform Indigenous family support services, and $1.4 million to improve culturally appropriate child protection practices

    Government and non-government organisations in partnership will develop and implement strategies and service models that will improve services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families, and access to them.

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