Mandatory reporting

The Child Protection Act 1999 (PDF) requires certain professionals, referred to as ‘mandatory reporters’, to make a report to Child Safety, if they form a reasonable suspicion that a child has suffered, is suffering or is at an unacceptable risk of suffering significant harm caused by physical or sexual abuse, and may not have a parent able and willing to protect them.

Mandatory reporters should also report to Child Safety a reasonable suspicion that a child is in need of protection caused by any other form of abuse or neglect.

Under the Child Protection Act 1999, mandatory reporters are:

  • teachers
  • doctors
  • registered nurses
  • police officers with child protection responsibilities
  • a person performing a child advocate function under the Public Guardian Act 2014
  • early childhood education and care professionals, from 1 July 2017.

Teachers include approved teachers under the Education (Queensland College of Teachers) Act 2005, employed at a school.

Doctors and nurses include those employed in both the public and private health sectors.

Child Safety employees and employees of licensed care services are mandated to report a reasonable suspicion that a child in care has suffered, is suffering or is at an unacceptable risk of suffering significant harm caused by physical or sexual abuse.

The department must provide notifiers from government or non-government agencies, which includes mandatory reporters, with information about the departmental response to child protection concerns reported (Child Protection Act 1999 (PDF), section 159M). The notifier is to be asked whether they require feedback at the time of the initial contact with the department. If the notifier requests feedback the department must:

  • provide information about the departmental response, the rationale for the decision and the likely timeframes for any departmental contact with the child or family.
  • provide the feedback either at the time of the initial contact by the notifier, if the departmental response is apparent, or by a follow up phone call, facsimile, email or letter, once the information has been screened and the departmental response has been determined.

Mandatory reporting by early childhood education and care professionals

From 1 July 2017, early childhood education and care (ECEC) professionals will be mandated by law to report child safety concerns to the department, where there is a reasonable suspicion that the child has suffered, is suffering, or is at unacceptable risk of suffering, significant harm caused by physical or sexual abuse, and there is not a parent willing and able to protect the child from harm.

ECEC professionals include staff from family day care, kindergarten, limited-hours care, long day care and after-school hours care. Individuals who are volunteers or under 18 years of age are not mandatory reporters.

ECEC professionals are not prescribed entities and cannot refer families to Family and Child Connect or an intensive family support service without their consent. If concerns about a family do not meet the legislative threshold for reporting to the department, ECEC professionals are encouraged to refer families to support services, with their consent.

The department is working in partnership with the Department of Education and Training and the Early Childhood Education and Care sector to ensure ECEC professionals can confidently report and refer vulnerable children and families to the right services at the right time.

Webinar

This webinar (read the transcript (PDF, 283 KB) transcript (DOCX, 40 KB)) was recorded on 2 May 2017 to support face to face workshops and the online training presentation. It features panel members from Child Safety and Family and Child Connect answering questions from early childhood education and care professionals about mandatory reporting roles and responsibilities.  

 Online training presentation

This presentation (PDF, 789 KB) has been developed for the early childhood education and care sector to understand their new role and responsibilities as a mandatory reporter. It will assist early childhood education and care professionals who are unable to attend a face-to-face workshop.

Please email any questions about the online presentation to MandatoryReporting@Communities.qld.gov.au

Workshops

The department has contracted NAPCAN (National Association for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect) to deliver training and information sessions for ECEC professionals across Queensland, commencing from February.

Visit the NAPCAN website to register to attend an information session in your area. For more information about the training and information sessions, call NAPCAN Queensland on 3287 3533.

Due to the popularity of these workshops, the department is providing additional sessions across Queensland prior to 1 July 2017, to meet the high demand for these sessions. Go to the NAPCAN website to book a session.

Information resources

Information sheet 1 – Mandatory reporting by early childhood education and care professionals (PDF, 475 KB)

Information sheet 2 - The Child Protection Guide (PDF, 476 KB)

Information sheet 3 - Principal Child Protection Practitioner (PDF, 382 KB)

Information sheet 4 - Sharing information with Family and Child Connect (PDF, 474 KB)

Information sheet 5 - What is Family and Child Connect? (PDF, 483 KB)

Information sheet 6 - Frequently asked questions (PDF, 490 KB)

Information sheet 7 - Understanding domestic and family violence (PDF, 453 KB)

Information sheet 8 - Impact of parental substance misuse on children (PDF, 357 KB)

Information sheet 9 - How to have a difficult conversation (PDF, 370 KB)

Family and Child Connect - information for professionals (PDF)

A guide to reporting child protection concerns and referring families to support services (PDF)

Contact sheet (PDF, 274 KB)

Mandatory reporting A3 poster (PDF, 218 KB)

Is your feedback

Please submit your comments on the department's Compliments and Complaints section.

Please submit your comments on the Queensland Government website Contacts form.