Glossary

The following words are commonly used in relation to positive behaviour support and restrictive practices.

Accommodation support

Services that provide accommodation to people with a disability and services that provide support needed to enable a person with a disability to remain in their existing accommodation or to move to more suitable or appropriate accommodation.

Adult with an intellectual disability

An adult with a disability who has a condition attributable to an intellectual or cognitive impairment, or a combination of the impairments.

Advocacy

Services designed to enable people with a disability to increase the control they have over their lives through the representation of their interests and views in the community. For example:

  • self-advocacy/individual advocacy
  • citizen advocacy
  • group advocacy
  • system/systematic advocacy.

Alternative formats of communication

Communication formats for people who, by reason of their disabilities, are unable to access information provided in the standard format. May include interpreter services, radio and alternative formats of print medium, e.g. Teletypewriter (TTY), Braille.

Appropriately Qualified or Experienced Person (AQEP)

A person with the qualifications or experience appropriate to conduct an assessment. Examples include behaviour analysts, medical practitioners, psychologists, psychiatrists, speech and language pathologists, occupational therapists, social workers, and persons with demonstrated experience in positive behaviour support practices. The role of the appropriately qualified or experienced person may be undertaken by Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services staff, staff of funded non-government service providers or persons from the private sector.

Chemical restraint

Chemical restraint of an adult with an intellectual or cognitive disability is the use of medication for the primary purpose of controlling the adult's behaviour. (Using medication for the proper treatment of a diagnosed mental illness or physical condition is not chemical restraint.) For the purposes of this definition, an intellectual or cognitive disability is not a physical condition. Diagnosed means a doctor has confirmed the adult has the mental illness or physical condition. Mental illness is defined in Section 12 of the Mental Health Act 2000.

Chief Executive

Unless otherwise qualified, the Chief Executive of the Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services (or a delegate).

Clinical Services (CS)

Previously referred to as 'Specialist Disability Services' (SDS), these are the Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services direct collaborative practice teams that provide specialised, multidisciplinary specialist services including behaviour assessment and behaviour support services to adults with an intellectual or cognitive disability whose behaviour causes harm to themselves or others.

Community access

Services designed to give people with disability opportunities to gain and use their abilities to enjoy their full potential for social independence by accessing their community.

Community support

Services that provide the support (other than the basic needs of living) needed for a person with a disability to live in a non-institutional setting in their community of choice. Support with the basic needs of living such as meal preparation, dressing, transferring, etc, are included under accommodation support.

Containment

Containment of an adult with an intellectual or cognitive disability means the physical prevention of the adult freely exiting the premises where the adult receives disability services, other than by secluding the adult. The adult is not contained, however, if they are an adult with a skills deficit only, and the adult's free exit from the premises is prevented by the locking of gates, doors or windows under the Act.

Disability services

Disability services, for people with a disability, means one or more of the following:

(a) accommodation support services
(b) respite services
(c) community support services
(d) community access
(e) advocacy or information services or services that provide alternative forms of communication
(f) research, training or development services.

Duty of care

This is a legal concept meaning the responsibility to take reasonable care to avoid causing harm to another person. A duty of care exists when it could reasonably be expected that a person's actions, or failure to act, might cause injury to another person.

Funded service provider

A service provider that receives funds from the Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services to provide disability services. A funded service provider includes Disability Services to the extent it provides disability services; however, it does not include another government department receiving funds from the Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services.

Guardian for a restrictive practice matter

Either:

  • a guardian for a restrictive practice (general) matter—a guardian appointed for the adult by QCAT to consent to the use of restrictive practice where an adult is receiving services (other than respite or community access services) or
  • a guardian for a restrictive practice (respite) matter—a guardian appointed for the adult by QCAT to consent on behalf of the adult in relation to the use of restrictive practice where an adult is receiving a respite or community access service only.

Harm

Harm to a person means:

  • physical harm to the person
  • a serious risk of physical harm to the person
  • damage to property involving a serious risk of physical harm to the person.

Informal decision maker

For an adult with an intellectual or cognitive disability, this means a member of the adult's support network, other than a paid carer for the adult within the meaning of the Guardianship and Administration Act 2000 (Qld).

Information/referral service

Information services provide accessible information to people with disabilities, their carers, families and related professionals. This service type provides specific information about disability-specific and generic services, equipment, and promotes the development of community awareness. Information includes contact by phone, print or e-mail that recommends a person to another service.

Intellectual or cognitive disability

Means an adult with a disability who has a condition attributable to an intellectual or cognitive impairment, or a combination of the impairments.

Mechanical restraint of an adult with an intellectual or cognitive disability means

The use, for the primary purpose of controlling the adult's behaviour, of a device to:

  • restrict the free movement of the adult, or
  • prevent or reduce self-injurious behaviour.

However, the following are not forms of mechanical restraint:

  • using a device to enable the safe transportation of the adult (eg a harness)
  • using a device for postural support
  • using a device to prevent injury from involuntary bodily movements, such as seizures
  • using a surgical or medical device for the proper treatment of a physical condition
  • using bed rails or guards to prevent injury while the adult is asleep.

Model positive behaviour support plan

Model positive behaviour support plan means a plan of that name prepared by the chief executive and published on the department’s website. The model plan incorporates the legislative requirements of the positive behaviour support plan and also reflects clinical best practice in a way that support workers can understand and implement on the ground in the support of adults with a disability.

Physical restraint

Physical restraint of an adult with an intellectual or cognitive disability means the use of, for the primary purpose of controlling the adult's behaviour, any part of another person's body to restrict the free movement of the adult.

Positive behaviour support plan (PBSP)

A plan to support an adult, including assessment, planning and implementation of strategies to meet the adult's needs, improve their capabilities and quality of life, and reduce the occurrence of the behaviour that causes harm, by developing skills.

Queensland Civil and Administrative Tribunal (QCAT)

QCAT is responsible for determining whether or not an adult has the capacity to make decisions about their life and whether there is a need to appoint appropriate decision makers / guardians, to act on the adult's behalf.

Research and evaluation

With respect to the provision of services funded under the National Disability Agreement for people with disabilities, this includes the investigation of the need for new services or enhancement of existing services and the measurement of outcomes for people with disabilities using these services. Responsibility for this service type is shared between the Australian Government and state/territory governments.

Respite

A short-term and time-limited break for families and other voluntary care givers of people with disabilities, to assist in supporting and maintaining the primary care giving relationship, while providing a positive experience for the person with a disability.

Restricting access

Restricting the adult's access, at a place where the adult receives disability services, to an object to prevent them using the object to cause harm to themself or others.

Restrictive practice

Means:

  • containing or secluding an adult with an intellectual or cognitive disability, or
  • using chemical, mechanical or physical restraint on an adult with an intellectual or cognitive disability, or
  • restricting access of an adult with an intellectual or cognitive disability.

Seclusion

Seclusion of an adult with an intellectual or cognitive disability means the physical confinement of the adult alone, at any time of the day or night, in a room or area from which free exit is prevented.

Short-term approval

An approval given by the Public Guardian under the Guardianship and Administration Act 2000 (Qld) (for containment and seclusion) or the chief executive of Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services (or a delegate) for restrictive practices other than containment and seclusion.

Model Statement about restrictive practices

This statement must be provided to the adult and people with a sufficient and continuing interest in the adult in an approved form and stating:

(a) why the relevant service provider is considering using restrictive practices in relation to the adult
(b) how the adult and the interested person can be involved and express their views in relation to the use of restrictive practices
(c) who decides whether restrictive practices will be used in relation to the adult
(d) how a complaint or review of the use of restrictive practices can be made.

Training and development

Services may be funded, for example, to train disability-funded agencies to deliver higher quality or more appropriate services to people with disabilities or develop materials or methods that promote service system improvements.

For more information see

Is your feedback

Please submit your comments on the department's Compliments and Complaints section.

Please submit your comments on the Queensland Government website Contacts form.