Improving out-of-home care and post-care for children and young people

The Queensland Government is committed to providing services that better support the safety, wellbeing and best interests of Queensland’s most at-risk children and young people.

Where there are no acceptable alternatives, children and young people will be taken into care, and protected and cared for. In care, they will receive the support they need to enjoy their childhood, feel safe and cared for, and develop into adulthood.

Out-of-Home Care Reform Initiative

The department is undertaking the Out-of-Home Care Reform Initiative to review its investment in placement services, determine the effectiveness of existing investment and provide options for future commissioning of placement services.

The Out-of-Home Care Reform Initiative will also consider alternative placement options as recommended by the Queensland Child Protection Commission of Inquiry, such as professional foster care (recommendation 8.10), boarding schools (recommendation 8.11) and therapeutic care.

The aim of the initiative is to revitalise the placement service system so that it is flexible and responds to the individual needs of children and young people, including their placement needs as well as medical, educational and therapeutic requirements.

We are working with our non-government partners to deliver new and improved services. These quality services are being delivered by people and organisations that care for the safety, wellbeing and best interests of children and young people. The department is now undertaking engagement with placement service providers to determine the effectiveness of existing investment and develop strategies for future investment.

An investment framework will be developed to guide future investment, and identify the outcomes, benefits and performance measures that would best support the placement needs of children and young people.

Out-of-Home Care Outcomes Framework

Placement services are a key component of the child protection service system to enable children and young people to reach their full potential, regardless of their situations.

The department is working in partnership with placement service providers to build a more robust out-of-home care system that focuses on achieving meaningful outcomes for children and young people in care.

To guide the collaborative approach between government and non-government services, an Out-of-Home Care Outcomes Framework (PDF, 753 KB) has been developed to establish a foundation in caring for children and meeting their placement needs including medical, educational and therapeutic requirements.

The framework aims to:

  • establish a shared vision in identifying and measuring outcomes for children in care
  • promote integrated and coordinated responses to the needs of children in care.
  • recognise the diversity and uniqueness of children’s needs in care.

The framework is structured around five domains for achieving or improving life outcomes for children and young people:

  • Safe and nurtured — children and young people feel cared for and nurtured in stable environments, safe from abuse, neglect, violence and harm.
  • Connected — children and young people are positively connected to family, culture and community and have a sense of identity and belonging.
  • Achieving — children and young people attend and engage in their education, meet developmental milestones, engage in and benefit from recreational activities and develop independence and life skills.
  • Healthy — children and young people are physically, emotionally and mentally healthy and lead an active and healthy lifestyle.
  • Resilient — children and young people feel confident and have social skills, coping skills and the ability to manage adversity.

Over the next six to 12 months, placement service providers will begin piloting the framework in their everyday work with children and young people. This action learning approach will enable services to test and refine the measures for ongoing quality improvement.

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Better support for foster and kinship carers

For children and young people who are unable to live at home with their own families, family-based care provided by foster and kinship carers is acknowledged as the preferred placement option for ensuring the safety, wellbeing and best interests of children. There are currently more than 8000 children and young people who are living with 5150 foster and kinship carer families in Queensland.

In response to the recommendations of the Queensland Child Protection Commission of Inquiry, the department is transferring foster and kinship carer services to the non-government sector to enable carers to access better support. Funding of $4.25 million over two years will be provided to non-government agencies to recruit and support foster and kinship carers. Kinship carers will have access to the same support as foster carers, including respite care.

Additional practical support and specialist training is also being provided by the department to foster and kinship carers to enable children and young people with complex needs to receive care which is more responsive to their needs.

This will enable Child Safety to refocus its child protection services in case management, investigations and assessments, and supporting families earlier.

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Care2Achieve: scholarships for young women leaving care

The Queensland Government is committed to supporting young people who are transitioning from care to independence to ensure they have every opportunity to achieve their full potential.

The Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services is investing $1.2 million in a new scholarship scheme, called Care2Achieve: scholarships for young women leaving care, to be delivered by The Smith Family over the next two years.

Up to 100 young women who are transitioning from care, or have left care to live as independent adults, will be awarded a scholarship to undertake higher education studies.

The first intake of 50 young women who are leaving care will receive scholarships to further their studies in their field of choice, commencing from January 2017.

The scholarship scheme will enable young women undertaking university studies to receive $3500 in their first year and $2500 for subsequent years. Young women studying at TAFE will receive $2500 for their first year and $1500 for subsequent years.

They will also receive mentoring, coaching and support to establish connections and networks with future potential employers.

Scholarships will continue for up to four years or until the completion of their chosen educational program.

The Smith Family has been successfully delivering a similar program for vulnerable young Queenslanders, called Learning for Life, which is achieving strong outcomes for vulnerable young Queenslanders.

For more information about Care2Achieve: scholarships for young women leaving care, go to The Smith Family website.

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Improving the health and wellbeing of children and young people in out-of-home care

Based on the recommendations of the Queensland Child Protection Commission of Inquiry, we are improving services for children and young people in care to enable them to live healthier lives.

The department has contracted KMPG to develop a new service model to guide the health assessment and management needs of children and young people in care.

The aim is to ensure that comprehensive health and development assessments are undertaken within three months of a child’s placement, and health management plans are developed and monitored.

The proposed new health assessment and management service model will be flexible and responsive to the individual needs of children in tertiary care, including high risk infants, adolescents, children and young people with disabilities and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children.

Children and young people subject to other forms of ongoing tertiary intervention will also have their health and development needs assessed and monitored, as part of the new service model. This will help parents receive the support they need to care for their children safely at home.

The new service model will align with the National Clinical Assessment Framework for Children and Young People in Out-of-Home Care.  The new service model proposal will be presented to the department for consideration, in consultation with Queensland Health.

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Permanent care for children and young people

All children and young people deserve to live in a safe and supportive home where they are valued and cared for.

In building a new child protection and family support system in Queensland, the department is working to reduce the number of children and young people in the tertiary system.

My Home is a new care option for children who need long-term out-of-home care and where reunification with family is no longer possible.

Couples who have been assessed by the department as suitable adoptive parents, or who have committed to an adoption assessment, can become permanent foster carers and provide a loving, nurturing and stable home where the child is considered as a member of their family.

Children under six years of age and subject to Child Protection Orders until they are 18 years old (or a decision has been made to apply for a Child Protection Order until they are 18 years old) will be placed with suitable permanent foster carers.

My Home also enables the department to consider whether the permanent foster carers will be the child's legal guardians under a Long-Term Guardianship Order to the carers. This allows the child to have the security and stability of living permanently with a family, without ongoing intensive involvement from the department.

Providing a permanent, stable home life allows children to form trusting and secure attachments to their carers, and feel a sense of belonging with family and community.

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Strengthening support for young people when they leave care

Next Step After Care

We are working with our non-government partners to deliver new and improved services for young people as they transition from statutory care to live as independent adults.

Targeted after-care support services, known as Next Step After Care, are now available for the first time, to young people up to 21 years old who have transitioned from out-of-home care, and who need help.

Next Step After Care offers young people two types of service:

  • A statewide connections program that young people can access 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
  • Tailored individual support in seven regions across Queensland.

Young people can access the Next Step After Care statewide service by calling or texting 1800 NextStep (1800 639 878), or by visiting the Next Step After Care website. This service is delivered by Life Without Barriers in partnership with Uniting Care Community and the CREATE Foundation.

New localised services have been established across Queensland to provide individual and tailored support to young people, particularly those with complex or multiple needs and who require face-to-face individual support. These services will be provided by:

  • Life Without Barriers in North Queensland, Central Queensland (excluding South Burnett), Brisbane, South West Queensland and South East Queensland
  • South Burnett CTC in South Burnett, with a strong cultural focus
  • Integrated Family and Youth Services on the North Coast
  • Youth Empowered Towards Independence, in partnership with Youth Link and Wuchopperen Health Services in Far North Queensland (including Cairns, Cape York Peninsula and the Torres Strait Islands).

These services will work with young people to develop their educational opportunities and job-ready skills, strengthen their self-reliance and independent living skills, and enable them to acquire and maintain stable and suitable accommodation.

Not all young people who have left care will require assistance, but for those who need help, the Queensland Government is committed to ensuring they receive the support they need.

Find out more about Next Step After Care or find the nearest service.

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Improving residential care services for children and young people

The new Hope and Healing Framework aimed at improving the care experience of young people in residential care will be implemented across Queensland from January 2017.

The framework will improve the quality of residential care provided to children and young people by ensuring the support they receive has a strong therapeutic focus to help them overcome trauma they may have experienced.

All residential care services, including supported independent living services and Safe Houses will be required to implement the Hope and Healing Framework.

The department has contracted PeakCare to work with the residential care service sector to implement the new framework.

PeakCare Queensland (in alliance with Encompass Family and Community Pty Ltd and Paul Testro Consultancy Services) developed the framework in 2015, following comprehensive consultation with the residential care sector.

A project manager will lead and coordinate the implementation of the Hope and Healing Framework, including:

  • facilitating regional workshops to map out strategies for implementation
  • establishing working groups to guide and support residential care services in adopting the new framework
  • conducting an audit of current training, learning and professional development activities across the residential care sector to inform the development of new foundational training modules
  • developing training materials and resources
  • liaising with TAFE Queensland to link training modules to qualification programming
  • monitoring, reviewing and evaluating ongoing training and professional development.

The Hope and Healing Framework will be fully implemented across the residential care sector by December 2018.

View the final reports:

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Is your feedback

Please submit your comments on the department's Compliments and Complaints section.

Please submit your comments on the Queensland Government website Contacts form.